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Paleo recipes: barbecue (BBQ) sauce

August 24th, 2010 · 6 Comments · Diet, Recipes

This recipe originated with Son of Grok.  As Son of Grok says on his Zesty Barbecue Zauce recipe, he read up about how to make BBQ sauce until he was an expert on what made a BBQ sauce.  Then he worked out how to do it paleo-style. 

My first attempt at this went a bit wrong.  Chris thought it was totally delicious, but then Chris likes his food extra spicy.  Personally I found it was so spicy that I could only tolerate it after I’d eaten several other spicy foods and had dulled my senses with two glasses of wine. 

The error had been an inability to locate any Dijon mustard so I’d used mustard powder, having forgotten that my 20 year old Coleman’s mustard powder (a superb storage cupboard staple which is good for rehydrating as emergency mustard or for adding in powder form into French dressings) is English mustard, not Dijon.  For those who don’t know, English mustard is bright yellow and far “hotter” than Dijon.

However, I’ve got some suggestions of variants now depending on quite how spicy you like it.  I’ve outlined below the original recipe and directions and then included the slightly different ingredients for the extra spicy and for the mild versions.  The directions remain unchanged.

Paleo barbecue (BBQ) sauce

Ingredients (makes enough to serve up with BBQ food for 6-8 people):
170g tomato puree
250-375ml beef stock
3 cloves garlic, finely diced or crushed
½ onion, finely diced
2 tbsp Dijon mustard
2 tbsp Apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp olive oil (preferably extra virgin)
1 tsp sea salt
2 tbsp chilli powder (we used mild chilli powder)

Directions:

  1. Combine all the ingredients in a pan.  Flex the amount of beef stock you use depending on how thick you want the BBQ sauce to be.  The first time I made this I used about 300ml and it was a pretty thick gungy paste at the end.
  2. Cover the pan with a lid (this is essential if you don’t want to decorate your kitchen with reddish sauce) and bring the sauce to a low simmer.  Leave to simmer, stirring and tasting frequently for about 20-30 minutes.

Note on serving and storing:

The reality is you can serve this with anything, best with almost flavourless meats (chicken, turkey etc) or very robust meats that will hold their own against the sauce (eg. beef or lamb).  Something with a nice delicate flavour of its own would get drowned out by this.

It seems to have a life of its own and keep forever in the fridge.  I’ve kept it for a week just in a bowl covered in film to keep the smells out but I’d imagine that it could keep a bit longer in an airtight jar.

Alternative ingredients lists – Extra Spicy

Excellent if you want a massive kick, or live with someone who fried their taste buds eating extra hot homemade curries all the way through their bachelor years and therefore only truly appreciates the extra strong flavours in life!

200g tomato puree
250-375ml beef stock
3 cloves garlic, finely diced or crushed
½ onion, finely diced
2 tbsp English mustard
2 tbsp Apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp olive oil (preferably extra virgin)
1 tsp sea salt
2 tbsp chilli powder (we used mild chilli powder but you could go the whole way and use hot chilli powder too – if you try that then do let me know how it goes!)

Alternative ingredients lists – Mild

For those of us who just want some depth of flavour to compliment the meat on our plate.

200g tomato puree
250-350ml beef stock
3 cloves garlic, finely diced or crushed
½ onion, finely diced
1½ tbsp Dijon mustard
2 tbsp Apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp olive oil (preferably extra virgin)
1 tsp sea salt
1 tbsp mild chilli powder

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